Come for a walk along the Dagenham Brook & Over Pole Hill

New tickets announced for my walks along The Dagenham Brook and Over Pole Hill

It’s been a fantastic summer of walks for Waltham Forest Borough of Culture as ‘psychogeographer-in-residence’. And now the final two walks have just been announced:

The Dagenham Brook

The Dagenham Brook

The Dagenham Brook, 22nd September 2pm –  book here

Waltham Forest Tours presents The Dagenham Brook with John Rogers, Psychogeographer-in-residence; a guided walk an overlooked stream in Waltham Forest.
Running from Leyton Jubilee Park to Coppermill Lane Walthamstow, the Dagenham Brook leads us through the streets of Leyton and Walthamstow weaving stories as it flows.
John will be joined by a local artist Lucy Harrison as part of this walk. A map of the walk is being produced in by printer Russell Frost of Hooksmith Press, Leytonstone.

Pole Hill Chingford

Over Pole Hill, 20th October 2pm – book here

 Explore the north-eastern frontier of both Waltham Forest and Greater London.
This will take the group up over Pole Hill, the highest point in the borough, which sits on Zero Longitude and was used by the Greenwich Observatory to set its telescope. You will also explore the terrain of the forest fringe.
As part of the walk, John will be joined by artist and illustrator Rachel Lillie, whose recent work includes the exhibition The In-between: An Ode to Epping Forest at Waltham Forest’s Vestry House. A map of the walk is being produced in by printer Russell Frost of Hooksmith Press, Leytonstone.

Lea Valley Walk from Walthamstow to Waltham Abbey

This Lea Valley walk from Walthamstow to Waltham Abbey is surely one of my favourites. I’d finished leading a walk across the marshlands from Leyton Water Works to Walthamstow Wetlands and had the desire to push on into the evening. I headed up along Blackhorse Lane then turned into Folly Lane which opens up the postcard image of the ‘edgelands’ – you could bring coachloads of anthropologists and urban geographers up here to Harbet Road with it’s pylons and fields of fly-tipping, mountains of rubble and stacks of shipping containers.

River Lea Navigation

It’s a relief to drop beneath the North Circular onto the towpath of the Lea Navigation, and slowly chug along the waterway like a listing barge. You note the phases of change passing through the outer rings of the city – London Waste, Ponders End, Brimsdown Power Station, the confluence with the Turkey Brook, Enfield Dry Dock and Enfield Lock, then Rammey Marsh and the final release of passing beneath the M25 and into the beyond.

 

filmed on 28th July 2019