B.S Johnson in High Wycombe

Did a classic walk in from Wycombe to Wooburn last week, along the River Wye. We’d gone down to do a talk to the Fine Art students at BCUC and I’d had this urge to walk home, chart the changes taking place to the area where I grew up as they manifest themselves along the river which gave the area it’s purpose and its identity.
But before I got onto the river I couldn’t resist a diversion to Gordon Road where BS Johnson stayed as an evacuee. Somebdoy contacted me via this blog to point out the long descriptions of Wycombe in his novel ‘Trawl’.
I started reading him because he lived in Claremont Square, Islington, just down the road from me, the top of Penton Mound. He writes about night-time schleps around Islington in ‘Albert Angelo’.
It’s another reference in my ‘autopobiography’.

You can read about the walk here: http://remappinghighwycombe.blogspot.com

london

This is a failed attempt to post a 10 second video clip directly from my phone. It works great with the picture messages you can see throughout this blog but doesn’t work with video. I’ve been using Flickr. If anyone knows how this can be done I’d love to know.

london

‘Walking Class Heroes’

Found the site of The Pedestrian Council of Australia whilst researching Walk to Work Schemes.
They promote a national Walk to Work Day. Their aims and objectives are pretty tame but at least it’s a start. I’m not really aware of anything similar in the UK apart from Sustrans who advocate cycling. The Ramblers only promote recreactional walking which is more or less true of Transport For London’s walking initiative.
http://www.walk.com.au/pedestriancouncil/page.asp

london

Pedestrian Culture

Pedestrian Culture
I went straight to this blog after I found yet another new route for my daily plod to work – how many more variations can there be on a walk from Penton Mound to the South Bank. This one goes from the end of Grays Inn Road along High Holborn down the alley next to Pendrals Oak into Lincolns Inn Fields (where I found a cluster of black cabs and white stretch limos last night), Portugal Street, Aldwych. A classic.

The reason I visited Pedestrain Culture is that this very idea is frequently on my mind during my walks – how, by making walking part of your functional routines, could transform daily life, and naturally by extension if people do it on mass our cities and town would be quite different places. Put simply – walking can change the world.

london